A Dedication to the Franks

Although my focus on history is usually centred on my native country of Scotland and the British Isles, I wish to explore the history of one of the Teutonic tribes from Continental Europe. The reason for this is that I have more recently felt drawn towards Continental Germanic spirituality as opposed to the Norse or Anglo-Saxon paths, particularly with regards to the tribe known as the ‘Franks’, who settled in what is now Flanders and the Netherlands as foederati; landed mercenaries hired by the Romans to defend their territory from other Teutonic tribes. The Franks went on to conquer Gaul and gave their name to France, and it is from them that the Franconian peoples are descended, namely the Dutch, Flemish and Afrikaners.

My own clan is descended from one of the Flemish families that participated in William the Bastard’s conquest of England and who were later invited to Scotland by David I in the 12th Century. Though the Franks were some of the main participants in abandoning their spiritual heritage in favour of the poison of Judeo-Christianity and spreading the disease to other tribes, they also had a reputation for ferocity and bravery and are an example of the archetype of the barbarian who fought against civilization only to succumb to its lure (as did many other Teutonic tribes during the ‘Folk-Wandering’ or ‘Migration Period’).

The Franks began as a confederation of smaller tribes who lived East of the Rhine, and coalesced into a singular ethnic entity in order to stand together against the Romans to the West. They were initially like most other barbarian tribes, described by the Romans as lacking armour and carrying swords, shields and the francisca, a type of throwing axe which was invented by the Franks and could bounce back when it hit the ground, potentially killing a foe from behind if you missed him on the initial throw. However, they do have their own origin history and are said to be descended from Trojans, which means that they may have had the same origin as the other Ten Lost Tribes of Israel and migrated to Western Germany.


Francisca, the tribal weapon of the Franks, note the curved head

The founder of their ruling dynasty, Merovech, was said to descend from a water god, possibly a Teutonic equivalent of Neptune. The confederation of tribes, led by the Cherusci and including the Bructeri and Sicambres, inflicted a crushing defeat upon the Romans at the Battle of Teutoburg Forest in 9AD. The Roman general Varus thought that he had secured the fealty of Arman, chief of the Cherusci, and accepted his invitation to pass through Teutoburg Forest with his army and retinue. The Romans were ambushed and slaughtered; the whole event was so traumatic to the Romans that Augustus subsequently went mad and they never again attempted to conquer the Germans, although they still raided their lands.

Between the 3rd and 5th Centuries AD, the Roman Empire was beginning to weaken and the Franks were frequently crossing the Rhine and invading the borderlands. Initially, the Romans had been able to repel them and return the favour; however, by this point civil war and reluctance to join the military among the Roman populace meant that they could no longer keep the Franks at bay and eventually they struck a deal with them. Several of the tribes would be settled on the other side of the Rhine in Toxandria (and areas which straddles both Flanders and the Netherlands) in exchange for military service, becoming known as the ‘Salian Franks’ (meaning ‘paid Franks’).

Thus, the Romans made allies of their enemies and the Franks became foderati, a system which eventually led to the Fall of the Roman Empire by allowing foreign warlords to take control of the army and carve up the empire among themselves. Though the Salian Franks were initially helpful in repelling invaders, and even participated in defeating the Huns and their allies at the Battle of Chalons, they began to adopt a more predatory attitude towards the weakening Romans, and so they broke their allegiance and pushed West until they reached the Somme under Chlodio. The exposure to Roman tactics and mass produced weapons and armour made them a more effective fighting force, and they simply decided to use this against the Romans when they became dissatisfied with their pay.

Eventually, the Franks on both sides of the Rhine were united under Childeric and his son, Clovis, through a combination of subjugating and assassinating rival chieftains. Clovis also conquered most of Gaul and put an end to the last vestige of Roman authority at Soissons. His Burgundian wife, Clotide, was a devout Catholic, and attempted incessantly to convert her husband, even causing the death of their first son through forced baptism. However, he was finally won over after gaining a victory against the Alemanni (another tribe from Western Germany) at the Battle of Tolbiac.

The story goes that Clovis was losing the battle and prayed to the Christian god rather than his own for victory, which he then achieved. To him, this proved the superiority of Christianity and he converted to Catholicism, despite the fact that the Catholics within his kingdom were outnumbered by both pagans and Arian Christians. Even more so, in the 7th Century Irish missionaries had to establish monasteries in Gaul in order to have more of an influence on the rural population, which was still largely pagan. This was the beginning of the gradual submission of the Teutonic tribes to the Catholic Church, which was one of the only things that united the Franks after the kingdom fell apart upon Clovis’ death.


The extent of the Frankish realm under Clovis

As was part of the Salic Law, Clovis’ kingdom was divided among his sons. This, however, only led to instability and the four kingdoms began to fight amongst themselves. Though the Frankish kingdom was eventually united again under Chlothar the Great in 613, they began to suffer raids from other tribes outside of the kingdom and were eventually faced with the Islamic invasion in the early 8th Century. The Muslims had conquered Spain and were now marching into France, but were defeated at the decisive Battle of Tours by the king’s regent, Charles Martel, in 732, halting any further Islamic advance into Europe.

Unfortunately, at this point the Merovingian dynasty was weaker than before and the kings were reliant on their generals. Eventually, the last Merovingian king was overthrown by Pepin the Short, who established a new dynasty and campaigned against the Basques as well as the Muslims. He also established Frankish vassal kingdoms in Spain, which eventually enabled the Reconquista and the eventual expulsion of Muslims and Jews from Spain. However, his son has been given more fame as a result of his conquests.

The Frankish king known as ‘Charlemagne’ (‘Charles the Great’) is one of the most famous and infamous rulers of the Dark Ages. While he managed to expand the Frankish domain well beyond its former territory, he was also a ruthless despot and Catholic fanatic, which is why he is also known as ‘Karl the Saxon Slayer’. He is remembered among Wotanists as the tormentor of the Saxons in Germany and for the defeat and subsequent forced conversion of their leader, Widukind. He oversaw the felling of oaks dedicated to Thunaer (Thor) and the various ‘Irminsuls’ (sacred poles representing the axis of the universe) in Germany.

However, despite helping to spread to Judeo-Christian virus to the other German tribes, he outlawed usury and defeated the Turkic Avar Empire in modern Hungary, neutralizing them as a threat to Western Europe. He may be most famous for helping Pope Adrian I by conquering the hostile Kingdom of Lombardy and for assisting Pope Leo III against his enemies in Rome, for which he was coronated as ‘Holy Roman Emperor’ by the pope. Thus, he is a divisive figure who represents both an effective monarch and a religious bigot, the builder of a hegemony that included much of Western Europe under one god and one king.

After Charlemagne’s death, his kingdom was inherited by his son, Louis, whose kingdom was then split among his three sons when he died. The resulting divisions were never again united, and the three kingdoms lay the foundations for the modern countries of France, Germany and Italy. Though France solidified into a centralized kingdom, Germany and Italy were governed as the Holy Roman Empire, a loose coalition of various duchies and city-states that swore fealty to the successors of Charlemagne.

By this time, the Latin -derived French language had become the tongue of the Western Franks and German the that of the Eastern Franks, although their native language persisted in the Frankish heartlands of Flanders and the Netherlands. Though these territories were claimed by either the French king or the Holy Roman Emperor, as trading centres they soon gained more power and influence and functioned largely independently of the kings they were supposedly ruled by. The Franconian peoples not only ventured to nearby Britain, but also became explorers and traders in the form of the Dutch Empire between the 16th and 20th Centuries, as well as the Boer colonies of South Africa.

Despite their noble origins and past conquests, the Franconians are not a numerous people, and are at risk of being outnumbered in their homelands by mass immigration from Islamic and African nations and are facing gradual genocide in South Africa. As a descendant of the Franks, I wish to invoke our brave ancestors and our gods to guide us in these dark times. The Franks are remembered as one of the foremost barbarian tribes who brought the might of Rome to its knees, and I am confident that the heroic spirit of those tribes can rise up again in their descendants to fight against the Modern Rome; the EU and the various globalist power structures that strangle our folk with the rope of Modern civilization.

Wodan, id est furor!

Wulf Willemson

Ragnarök and the Fate of the West in the New Age

The lamentable state of our civilization is part of a natural process that must be undergone. The world has only recently passed into the Age of Aquarius, known to the Ancient Greeks as the ‘Lead Age’. The current cycle is known in the Norse Eddas as Ragnarök (‘doom of the gods’), which coincides with the dreaded Fimbulwinter and the battle between the gods and the Jötnar. Naturally, if the inheritors of a civilization feel that ‘God is dead’, then this has already happened. However, the war rages on after the deaths of Wotan, Thor, Tyr and Heimdall. In time, their jötunn slayers are avenged by Wotan’s son, Widar and Thor’s sons Magni and Modi (‘great’ and ‘brave’). Widar becomes a reincarnation of Wotan when he kills Fenrir, and has been identified with Kalki ‘the Avenger’ from Hindu mythology (an incarnation of Vishnu). This is followed by a time of renewal, in which Balder and Nanna return at the beginning of spring (Imbolc).

The stories of Balder’s Death and Ragnarök as described in the Eddas refer to the yearly cycle, and each event in the story is marked by the seasonal festivals. However, they also refer to cycles in human consciousness and the rise and fall of civilizations. We are destined to repeat history because it is part of Natural Law to experience life, death and rebirth, and so our societies reflect this. This is also directly tied to the fate of the Aryan race and the civilizations that they create, attempt to sustain and eventually neglect. As the creators of civilization, we feel most capable when engaged in the process of generation, reflected in inventiveness, imagination and exploration. The reason for this is that, since the Aryans ultimately descend from the Silver Age Atlanteans and before that, the Hyperboreans of the Golden Age (who lived at the North Pole at a time before it froze), we are naturally engaged in rajasic (productive, passionate, generative) behaviour in our homeland of Europe. Survival in a cool and temperate climate means having to store food over winter (resulting in the trait of long-term thinking) and to eat meat and fats to endure the cold. The type of society resulting from this lifestyle is that of hardiness, honour and wit, where the tribal bond and the connection to the land are still held sacred because of the need to work together to survive in a cold climate.

This differs from the sattvic (goodness, peace, equilibrium) effect that occurs when the Aryans migrate to warm and dry climates. There, the tendency is more to build and sustain a civilization and to invite other races to become part of it. The less severe the winters of a land, the less need there is to store food and eat animal flesh to survive. This is one of the reasons why the Aryan religions of India (Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism) are more prone to vegetarianism and pacifism to a greater or lesser degree. The ancient civilizations of Anatolia, Sumer, Egypt and the Indus Valley were all founded by Aryans and went on to become states. The natural inequalities between the races meant that hierarchy became necessary in order to differentiate ranks and roles, and so this is how the caste system of India originated. East of the Indus River, Aryan culture was preserved to the present day, where it survives in the form of the three aforementioned religions. However, in Central Asia, the Middle East and Egypt, some of the Aryans became corrupted by engaging in black magic and began to worship demons that they encountered when they ventured into the desert as ascetics, or if they were engaged too much in acquiring material power.

This represents the danger of adopting extreme lifestyles in foreign lands, and eventually Aryans became disconnected from their heritage and began to mix with the local peoples. Though such societies may be based on spiritual piety and moral goodness, they also begin to grow stagnant once they remain in a fixed form for too long. The elaborate law codes, taxes and censuses needed to run a state eventually become a burden on the people because the society becomes managed by bureaucracy. Typically, states that emerge from kingdoms into oligarchy and later democracy begin to expand and build empires based primarily on either military expansion or trade (though they always have both). The function of the society becomes focused on sustaining the civilization itself and not the people that created it. The subsequent confusion resulting from the formation of a multicultural society causes it to fracture and break into competing factions, each asserting their own interests. This is when a civilization goes into decline and experiences increasing inequality based not on worth, but on wealth.

Thus the slow slip into Fimbulwinter begins. After Balder is killed and the Jötnar (demons) grow in strength, the Aryans then engage in tamasic (darkness, ignorance, perversion) behaviour and abandon their ancient beliefs altogether, completely forgetting their gods or adopting those of the people they originally conquered. This happened in the Roman Empire with the adoption of Judeo-Christianity, and later on in the British Empire with the proliferation of Zionism and Marxism. The Aryan folk lose faith in the society that they have created because they no longer feel inspired to create. The barrenness of urban life and cosmopolitanism drives many to despair as they lose touch with their spirituality. The promises of equality and fairness begin to be used against the Aryans and their empires are squabbled over by foreign warlords, leaving the civilization in ruin. However, as long as the ethereal blood inherited from the Golden Age runs through our spiritual veins, we may be reborn and live to create again. After each age comes the cleansing of the world, and this age will be no different. Widarr (‘wise noble’ or ‘the silent one’) is destined to avenge the death of Wotan and destroy Fenrir, the demon of greed.

As we are currently moving into a new age, we can expect that conditions will emerge in which Balder can return and we will move into a new spring. The Völuspá (‘prophecy of the seeress’) promises that “fields unsowed [will] bear ripened fruit” and that “all ills grow better”, which probably means that we will find new ways to produce food and heal our spiritual diseases. However, this will also be accompanied by tumultuous change, the onset of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse and the resulting overthrow of the ‘New World Order’, an attempt to draw in all nations into one and to destroy the equilibrium of our planet. Widar is the ‘Silent Avenger’, working from behind the shadows of falsehood and lies that blind us in the West today. Our folk will awaken and we will restore our dignity and pride. We simply have to understand that we must survive in order to continue the process of human civilization, otherwise the whole world would fall into chaos. This does not mean that our race is more necessary than any other, but that we will a unique role as dreamers and visionaries, explorers and conquerors.

The creative spark which we inherit from the gods has been passed down to us in order to act as mediators between them and mankind. As individualism pervades society and each person feels whittled down to their singular ego, we then feel cut off from our purpose and consider events in the world only from the level of threat to ourselves. Thus, the survival instinct is lost and many simply give up from loss of hope. This is inevitable given the dreadful conditions under which most of us live, where our souls are crushed under the corporate monotony of daily life. Though materialism is still promoted because of its success in keeping us distracted, it is increasingly becoming less satisfying and many of us are searching for something more. That something is that divine impulse which drives us towards success, honour and victory. It may be in our nature to be melancholic, but it is not in our nature to lose. With courage, wisdom and strength, we will win and we may live to see what will inspire us in the new age.

Wulf Willelmson

Yule: Festival of Light on the Darkest Day

Merry Yuletide to you all, whether you choose to celebrate the most important European holiday on the Winter Solstice or on Christmas Day, this festival marks the return of light and the sun during the cold and dark winter. The warmth and light of the hearth provided a focus for almost all activities at this time of year, and so families would be engaged in close contact for much of the winter season. In our busy, Modern lives it can be difficult to make time for our families, which is why it is important to make the effort to spend time with our loved ones at some point during the festival.

However, there is also a side to this holiday that has a dark and sinister aspect. Cailleach Beira, the Winter Queen, is most powerful at this time of year, and with this comes the dreaded plagues of disease, hunger and despair. Though we do not have to worry so much about foraging and storing food as our ancestors did, it is still the case that various diseases, particularly the cold and flu, can affect us most strongly at this time of year. Aside from these physical ailments, seasonal depression resulting from a lack of sunlight can cause us to feel a sense of hopelessness, as if the sun can never return into our lives.

Therefore, it is important not only to maintain a nutritious diet for oneself (since what is healthy for one person may be detrimental to another within traditional medicine), but also to continue to exercise and keep occupied. Though the cold and dark outside drives many of us indoors and onto our electronic devices, we must also take care not to become too distracted by this, because this is the best time of year to do important inner work and examine our present situation in our lives. Do you have something that must be done in the coming year? Is there something that needs your attention and focus in order to move forward? Though the slow and sluggish atmosphere at this time of year makes it difficult to take action, it is still worth preparing and planning for the future ahead.

In mythological terms, Yule is when Wotan (as Hermóð) descends to Helheim to petition to Hel, ruler of the Underworld, to release Balder (the Norse ‘Krist‘) and Nanna from death. She refuses, but allows him to accept gifts from Balder and Nanna to take back to Ásgarð. This is where the tradition of gift-giving comes from, but it is only possible if Wotan ventures into the Underworld to retrieve them. In an allegorical sense, this means that we must journey into the darkest depths of our psyche in order to gain a fuller understanding of ourselves, and face that part of us which is weak and reluctant to move on into the new year. What is holding you back in life? Can something be done about it and, if so, how should you go about it? These are all things worth considering while we are not spending time with our loved ones around a warm fire (even if not in a literal sense, but rather the fire of our hearts).

The bareness of the trees and the grey colour of the sky can make things seem hopeless and forlorn. As Western civilization enters into its darkest hour, it can make the future ahead appear frightening and full of uncertainty. Yet, if we manage to cultivate within ourselves that light that has been handed down to us, then we can endure the darkness and live to see a brighter future. The growing awareness of our place in this world that emerging after the severing of our roots means that we must strive to plant the seeds of a a new civilization. However, this will take time, and we must be not only strong, but patient and willing to shed those parts of us which refuse to move on and accept the change that is happening. Yule is celebrated to remind us winter never lasts forever.

God Géol!

Wulf Willelmson

Abrahamism: The Doctrine of Deception

The art of deception is one of verbal and conceptual persuasion, designed to give a false impression of reality. This could range from something resulting from the fragility of a human ego, such as somebody who lies in order not to get in trouble, to potentially more sinister and purposeful intentions to gain power through misleading others. This sort of lying relies on saying something that oneself knows not to be true, but that can be used to coerce people into thinking or behaving in a way that benefits oneself. An example of this would be the threat of Hell, a common feature of the Judeo-Christian and Islamic dogmas. The imagery of a fiery place where sinners would burn in eternity is not emphasized in the Bible, though it is consistently referred to in the Koran; the Christian interpretation is mainly based on the Greek concept of Tartarus, a part of the Underworld reserved only for the most evil men after death.

The idea of Hell is not likely to be true in a literal sense, and the esoteric understanding is that Hell is a state of being rather than a physical place. If this is understood within the context of reincarnation, then it may refer to a life after death that is Hellish rather than a physical realm of torment. The only reason that there is a belief in the concept of a literal Hell is because foolish preachers and clergy believe in such things and tell other people to believe in it as if it were true. This is not true deception, since the false believer is not aware that his belief is a delusion. The more worrying aspect of this is when a spiritual adept knows that this is the case, but chooses to present a false impression to others for the sake of control.

The reason I wish to draw attention to this particular subject is because we are constantly being deceived in society through religious, academic, social and political institutions. They have been constructed in a way that is designed to trap us in false realities, confirming our delusions by extending the same indoctrination to the entire population. Naturally, there will always be those that can understand the difference between right and wrong, truth and lie; but it is also the case that we all suffer from delusion to some extent, because of lies that we tell ourselves or are told to us. Because of the insecurity of the human ego, this smaller part of us wishes to become whole, and will attach itself to any ideas or belief systems that appeal to our perception of the world. While it is worth believing in things that help to complete our picture of reality, since none of us can know everything, this also means that we must be careful of not adopting perspectives that contradict observable facts and our personal experiences. Fear of the unknown is one way that we can choose to believe in ridiculous ideas that, rather than meant to make sense of the world, only serve to cause us anxiety or even anger.

It is this weaker state of being that we can be taken advantage of, and can be persuaded to believe what is not true because it cannot be shown to be so. Sometimes, we choose to believe lies because the truth can be too hard to face. This is unfortunately why so many of us suffer from personality disorders and compulsive behaviour. When one knows that what he sees either in the world around him or within himself is not true, it causes angst because it does not fit with our worldview. This can then cause cognitive dissonance and result in the adoption of delusion. We have all had something that we thought about ourselves or our surroundings proven wrong, such as realising that we were not as talented as we thought, or that we are having constant issues with our environment that is causing personal distress. It is the refusal to acknowledge these problems that makes us feel like we have to believe what we are told in order to make us feel better about our situation, rather than facing up to the truth of it. In this sort of instance, we are then vulnerable to the machinations of liars and charlatans who wish to gain power for themselves.

It is unfortunate that our society has become ponerized, meaning that, because those with the most power suffer from psychopathy, then this is reflected in the society and psychopathic behaviour has become normalized. This means that deception is present in all aspects of society. From the food we eat to the clothes we wear, we are given a false impression of the scale of the effect that our decisions within a consumer society have on our environment and on other nations. We do not see the damage of our collective actions because they are obscured behind the constant presence of technology in our lives that distract us from realizing the true scale of destruction caused by over-civilization. People who are misled in turn mislead others as part of a cycle of entrapment within an ever-intrusive system. The lies told by corporations, the media and politicians are meant to make us think that the solutions to problems are only those which can be done within the confines of an already established system, which is the one that is being used to abuse us.

The system that has been created is founded upon the principles of using distortion and distraction in order to fool others into believing in a false version of reality. It is a tactic employed by psychopaths in order to conceal their true intentions. One example of this would be how such people hide behind the mask of Judaism as a way to shield themselves from criticism. By associating their actions with this particular ethno-religious group, they are able to simultaneously make their actions synonymous with Judaism while also getting away with their crimes by invoking claims that ‘anti-Semitism’ is being directed against them, even if most Jews have nothing to do with their machinations.

Thus, they have ensured for themselves a way to evade justice by both associating their actions with Jews as a whole and also the resulting reluctance to call out their behaviour by those who do not wish to seem anti-Semitic. The same is also true for Islam, where criticism of extreme interpretations of Islamic ideology has been interpreted as ‘racism’, even though such things have little to do with the race of those involved. While followers of the Abrahamic religions may not be involved at all in creating lies and are probably deceived themselves, and there is no point therefore in going after those that blindly follow, there is still a strong tradition of deception inherent in the Abrahamic faiths.

This technique of managing society through fear and scapegoating has been continuously built on top of our traditional societies since the migrations of peoples from the Middle East and North Africa into Europe, who brought with them the Abrahamic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. However, these belief systems are not based on the folk religions of that part of the world, though Judaism and Islam in particular have incorporated much of their practices into their own religions (as Christianity has absorbed many aspects of native European traditions).

Rather, the most destructive forms of these religions form a specific cult which spreads itself through intolerance and falsehood. Abrahamism is named as such after the Hebrew patriarch Abraham, the first iconoclast and smasher of ‘idols’, beginning the trend of destroying pagan worship within our groves and temples. He saw the expressions of the divine in the forms of images as distortions of divinity, as his own ego could not handle the concept of representing a divine force in physical form. It was this practice of controlling what symbols could be used to represent God and blaming others for spreading lies in order to maintain control over society that has been passed down to the present day among those who have power in religion and the media.

This was the beginning of a religion rather than a race, and it is worth emphasizing that the Ancient Hebrews were the descendants of European nomads (Hyksos) who settled in the Middle East and Egypt, and that modern ‘Jews’ are mainly descended from Levantines and North Africans (Sephardi Jews) and a tribe of Scythians known as ‘Khazars’ (Ashkenazi Jews). The ‘Israelites’ of the Bible were also known as the ‘Cimmerians’ and, after being expelled (interpreted as being ‘freed from slavery’ in the Bible) from Egypt settled first in Scythia, then Anatolia (Troy) after being expelled by the Scythians before being expelled by the Greeks and migrating to the British Isles, becoming the Welsh (‘Cymry’ comes from the name ‘Cimmerian’ and ‘Welsh’ from the Anglo-Saxon ‘wealas’, meaning ‘foreigner’) as well as the Gaels in Northern Spain (before moving on to Ireland) and also the Romans in Italy.

These groups are what became known as the ‘Ten Lost Tribes of Israel’, while the Judahites and Levites settled West of the Dead Sea and mixed with the locals, resulting in the culture of Pharisaic Judaism described in the New Testament. Again, these historical peoples are not for the most part what we could consider today to be ‘Irish’, ‘Welsh’, ‘Italian’ or ‘Jewish’ as they colonized the local peoples and absorbed them into their cultures, while also incorporating many of their local customs.

They brought with them a corruption of Aryan spirituality, which instead of being designed to spread truth to man, uses lies to deceive men in order to control them and gain material power. Firstly through the introduction of usury, whereby a man could borrow cattle from a nobleman at interest, ensuring a profit for the ‘Hebrew’ (deriving from the Ancient Egyptian ‘apiru’ and Akkadian ‘habiru’, meaning ‘bandit’ or ‘robber’). The corrupted nobleman could then use a bonded man to do labour for him and fight in his warband, all through deceiving a man into thinking that this sort of behaviour would not lead to the enslavement of his descendants through inherited debt. Thus began the introduction of forced labour and conscription, forming the basis of the state and the beginning of slavery in Western Europe.

Profit rather than honour and glory became the motive for warfare, and this cultural infection spread to Continental Europe, resulting in what has become known as ‘Celtic’ civilization, which was merely the local culture being driven by foreign motives. Though the newcomers were forced to share power with the druids, they were engaged in a power struggle from this point on, and frequently employed mercenaries to undermine the druids’ traditional authority. The Western European tribes began to form into states, presided over either by a king or by a council of corrupted druids acting as a senate.

After the Romans had sufficiently taken over much of the Mediterranean and Europe (the Romans were invited by ‘Celtic’ chieftains in Britain and Gaul to help fight their enemies), they then began a policy of incorporating the local religions into the Roman state religion, culminating in the Cult of the Emperor under Augustus and eventually in the adoption of Judeo-Christianity under Constantine. The institution of the Catholic Church, which outlived the Western Roman Empire, was able to continue the process of corruption and control over Europe. Though the ‘Celtic Christianity’ that was promulgated in the British Isles was initially an attempt to reconcile the traditions of Druidism with Judeo-Christianity, it was eventually overtaken by mainstream Catholicism in the Middle Ages and soon after Germania and Scandinavia also succumbed. This process also happened in Eastern Europe, due to the promotion of ‘Orthodox Christianity’ by the Byzantine Romans.

After the Middle Ages and the subsequent Protestant Reformation, Kingdom and Church morphed into People and Market, and the materialistic political religions of Capitalism and Socialism took over from the earlier form of social control. These ideologies are presented as options because they work within the material world, not in the spiritual one where these corrupt elites (plutocratic banksters and treacherous ‘clergy’ and ‘royalty’) possess knowledge that is purposely hidden from us, becoming ‘occult’ (meaning ‘hidden’). The self-serving system of our society is a result of the deliberate deception that is practised by all capable advertisers and socialites. When a person with completely selfish motives is not recognized for what they are out of misplaced respect and trust, then they are able to take advantage of others and convince them that their way is the right one, even though they simply mean to make us do what they want.

This information is one interpretation of the events described in the Old Testament and the subsequent building of so-called ‘Modern society’, where we are fooled into believing what is not true and helping to destroy ours and other peoples’ societies in order to advance an agenda at odds with our own self-interest. Those exhibiting psychopathic behaviour are using their skills to persuade others to believe in these false religions that they have created, which are only there to mislead us. This does not mean that those who hold beliefs derived from these religions are necessarily psychopathic, but that those involved in organizing others religiously or politically may have a tendency to exploit these religions because of their history.

As far as I am aware, these facts add up to contradict the given wisdom concerning the history of Judaism, and so the claim that the Jews are descended from the Ancient Hebrews is a misinterpretation perpetuated by the Abrahamic dogmas, in order to hide the identities of these psychopaths under the guise of ‘Christians’, ‘Muslims’ or ‘Jews’. It is because their religion is connected to others merely under their control that they can use these groups to fight amongst each other, a tactic played out mostly in political situations today and in the conflict between the Left and Right wings (two wings of the same bird).

However, these lies are starting to fall apart. The proliferation of information through the Internet has given us access to the knowledge that can be used to pass through the veil of illusion and see our world the way it is. The narrative that I have given is the sum of research using mostly online sources. Such information was once jealously guarded by the corrupted clerics, and are still difficult to interpret. Even the version of events presented here may have some incorrect information and conclusions, in which case I would urge anybody reading this to find out these things for yourself, as you now can. However, such endeavours must be accompanied by time spent with others or in Nature, as the virtual world can distort reality, as the forces that seek to deceive us in real life also operate online. Therefore, it is wise to know how to discriminate and know what information is useful and what is merely meant to sell us a product.

A society based on falsehood has been built up around us, and so we must be careful in escaping the web of lies that we do not cut at our roots. These days, the original folk beliefs are mixed in with Abrahamic religions, (and Abrahamism is sometimes present in Neopaganism) and so judgement of action is more important than judgement of belief. We do not want to be fooled into fighting against our fellow man, for if we do, then we fight against ourselves. Our quarrel is with those who use religious and political systems as a pretext for power-grabbing. The practices of Abrahamism are a misuse of spiritual knowledge in order to have control over the masses. Zionism and Islamism are their modern-day expressions and are used to abuse people all over the world. It can be difficult to know who to trust in such dark times, though we can discern those who have our best interests at heart if we know who our kindred and allies are. Remember, truth will set you free.

Wulf Willelmson

The Monarch and the Anarch

It may seem strange for a self-professed monarchist to endorse the concept of anarchism, since the idea of having no leaders is at odds with unity under a single leader. However, I do think that it is possible for such contradictory concepts to co-exist within a single worldview, but a distinction must be made between anarchism as a political ideology and as a personal philosophy. The promotion of the state of anarchy is an ideological manifestation of the chaotic forces within the human psyche which is, in essence, a state of absolute individualism and the absence of any collective identity.

This is not the same as applying the principles of anarchism to oneself, which is something that does not exclude a collective consciousness. However, this is only possible for those who are capable of becoming fully individuated, and will not be a desirable path for those who require leadership and direction from others. Monarchy is the natural state for a group to exist, since one leader is needed to act as the head of a collective. Unfortunately, this becomes a problem once a monarchy becomes a state, which extends the collective beyond the individual, essentially violating the principle of mutual consent and enveloping all inhabiting a given territory within its net.

Being an ‘anarch’ rather than just an ‘anarchist’ means living an independent life and answering to none but one’s own inner direction. An anarch may be in league with a monarch for mutual benefit, but this is something which can only ever be continued through contractual obligation. Once there is no longer a reason for an anarch to remain allied to a monarch, then he may leave the monarch’s ‘realm’ and exist instead as a freeman. This system of anarcho-monarchism is the ideal mode of human interaction, but unfortunately the mechanism of the state has been imposed upon us from above and makes it impossible for an individual to exist outside of its jurisdiction. Common law is present as a way of making each individual responsible for themselves and to recompense or seek compensation from other individuals for any infraction committed, as defined by common sense.

Criminal law is only ever something which is defined by an external authority, which is usually the state but may also be influenced by wealthy lobbies and even public opinion. It is the assumption that the individual has transgressed against the collective rather than another person, and so the state becomes the arbiter of justice and defines what is and what isn’t a crime. The problem with the application of criminal law is that if the state becomes abusive (and at this point, all are in some form or another), then it means that the law will be used to persecute those who are not truly criminals, only dissidents, even if they are non-violent.

It is for this reason that all over the world we must endure laws enacted against freedom of speech and thought, personal possession of weapons and substances and basic rights to natural utilities. Every aspect of human existence is becoming increasingly regulated and scrutinized, to the point where more and more just can’t handle the unnatural conditions that this fosters and choose to end their lives or those of others. If we are not allowed to exist as individuals, then the human endeavour becomes reduced to what the collective deems to be worthwhile, which becomes impossible to break free from once a state is established. While it is certainly true that there must be some level of social control employed, it must be based on divine principles, which are discovered from within and transcend the ego. An individual who can utilize their talents to direct and employ the service of others is only able to act as an effective monarch if he is aware of his own responsibilities to his kinsmen. It is not about having absolute control over others and interfering in as many aspects of their lives as possible.

In Britain, we used to have elective monarchies, which functioned on the basis of all freemen gathering together to vote for the one who was seen to be the best leader. This was known among the Norsemen as the álthing, and it was through the selection process that the best man from among the nobility, the jarl, was drawn, who was the spiritual leader of the tribe. There were equivalents in all of the various British cultures, and it was only with the Romans that we were subjected to state tyranny. Thankfully, they never managed to conquer Scotland, and so here the old ways continued for longer.

However, after the Normans led by William the Bastard gained a foothold in England, the concept of the state was introduced to Scotland with the reforms of David I, who sought to centralize his authority and established a system of permanent primogeniture and hereditary monarchy. Ever since then, we have undergone the increasing encroachment of the state into our lives, beginning with the so-called ‘divinely appointed’ Medieval monarchs, who later became ‘constitutional monarchs’. The result is that in Modern times, we have had many a weak and ineffective monarch who is subject to the will of a corrupt and decadent parliament which does the bidding of powerful corporations and banks. Now, the British monarch is more of a celebrity and a mere facet of national sentimentality rather than a leader.

I have already discussed the details of tribal monarchy in my article concerning Neo-Monarchism, and so I wish to return to the concept of anarchism, specifically the misinterpretations of it. The most common attribution of anarchism in recent times is to the communist group known as Antifa, who act as redshirt street-thugs against perceived ‘fascists’. However, the sort of anti-statist rhetoric touted by such organizations is based on the writings of Karl Marx, who proposed the implementation of a stateless society where all is held in common. On the face of it, the Marxist doctrine appears to advocate anarchism, since the undesirable state has been removed and resources are available to all.

However, since private property has always existed among human societies (at least with regards to handmade goods as opposed to land which has traditionally been held in common), the complete abolition of private property means that the individual is not recognized as a sovereign entity. This means that all utilities are subject to the will of the collective, which is the difference between the utopia of communism and the ideal of anarchism, that is the freedom to choose who to work with or for. Absolute collective ownership is only possible with the oversight of some external authority, which is why all attempts to implement communism have failed to abolish the state, as the state is necessary to administer redistribution. This is similar to the concept behind fascism, where the individual and the state become subsumed into one entity and essentially leads to the same result, except that private property is still acknowledged.

Aside from these misunderstandings which arise among anti-social adolescents and weak-willed men, there exist many appendages to anarchist thought, each of which focuses on the individual’s perception of an ideal lifestyle. Some may prefer to emphasize reducing reliance on technology, others to pursue private enterprise and there are also those of us who seek to work as individuals for the sake of their nation. The obligation of an individual to any collective should be voluntary, and each should be able to exercise freedom of association based on one’s own personal values.

Without the state, you have less need to feel resentment towards others, because you then become responsible for yourself and therefore have nothing to complain about if you subject yourself to authority, since it is a mutually agreed partnership where both parties must agree to the terms of a contract if one is made. Anarchy is a term used to describe the state of leaderlessness, where every individual is out for themselves and no collective unity is present. It is for this reason that monarchy is necessary to provide guidance for those who need it and for a monarch to fulfil his role as a leader. However, we should still allow for the presence of the anarch, who may remain on the outskirts of the tribal territory or wander from place to place, guided by his own inner light.

Wulf Willelmson

‘Winter Nights’, the Wotanist New Year

No other festival in the pagan calendar has as many associations with witchcraft, faeries and ghosts as Winter Nights, more commonly known as ‘Hallowe’en’ or  as ‘Samhain’ in Wicca and the Gaelic tradition.  The Old English name for this time was ‘Winterfylleth’, which according to the Anglo-Saxon historian, Bede, referred to the full moon that signalled the beginning of winter. Though it is unknown what the name of this blot was to the Norsemen, it has been suggested that it was what was known as ‘Álfablót’, meaning ‘elven sacrifice’. This blot was not a public ritual in Scandinavia, and was concerned primarily with the ancestral cult of the family and home. However, in the British Isles it has always been a more social festival, where folk would go to each others’ homes guising, wearing a scary costume so as to fool mischievous spirits who would mistake them for their own rather than humans that they could play tricks on.

Though the traditional date in Modern times is the 31st of October, this is due to the fact that we use an exclusively solar calendar, and so the festival would have been celebrated on or around the full moon nearest this time, as suggested by the Old English word fylleth, which meant the full moon. Nevertheless, the festival could last between three to seven days, and so celebrations were not confined to a single day. Whichever specific evening during this time was deemed best for communication with the spirit world was the time of the ancestral offering.

The primary focus of veneration would be one’s ancestors, and the ritual would involve a whole household. The family would gather around a bonfire to perform the blót, a feature which is still present in Celtic tradition. However, in Modern Britain it is now more of a feature of Guy Fawkes Night, which is a secularized version of All Hallows Eve that largely replaced the original folk festival following the Reformation and is celebrated on the 5th of November. The bonfire was meant to keep away evil spirits that dislike the light. Offerings from the harvest, such as crops or animals, were given to ensure good luck for the coming winter. It was at this time that the oldest and weakest cattle were to be sacrificed in order to be able to feed the rest of the herd over winter, and the ancestors’ spirits were invited to join in the feasting.

The jack-o’-lantern was originally a carved-out turnip which had a face that was meant to represent the household spirits, which are known as ‘brownies’ in Scots or ‘hobgoblins’ in English and as a ‘Kobold’ in German or ‘domovoi’ in Russian. These creatures are usually described as little hairy men who protect the household and are said to help to do housework in exchange for offering of bread or milk. If offended or neglected, they are likely to cause mess and play tricks on mortals. As these creatures were also most easily seen around during Winter Nights, their abilities to protect the home were utilized and were represented by the faces now carved into pumpkins, though this has generally lost its original meaning. These domestic spirits were not considered the same as the spirits of the ancestors, but they were tied to families and could follow them if they moved to a different home.


Modern-day turnip Jack-o-lantern

As Winter Nights was a liminal time, contact with faeries or the dead was most successful around this time. It was for this reason that divination was a traditional part of Hallowe’en up until recently, though this aspect of the holiday is being revived along with the new acceptance of and interaction with the supernatural. Any reflective surface could be used to see visions, including a mirror, a crystal ball or a ‘keek stane’, a convex piece of reflective glass kept in a box in the Scottish tradition. It is at this time that special care was taken not to visit haunted places, though there are stories of foolish folk who came upon these places by chance or deliberately. Although the protective spirits of the ancestors and the brownies were most active around this time, so were potentially pernicious beings such as goblins or ghosts, which is why ghost stories are often told or set during this time. It was also a time when witches would be working magic, taking advantage of heightened contact with the spirit word, some of whom had ill intentions. It is for this reason that witches feature so prominently in Hallowe’en imagery.

As this holiday was meant to signify the coming of winter, death became more present in the minds of our ancestors who required the good luck from the ancestral spirits in order to increase their chances of surviving the cold season. This was the time of year that most young children died from sickness, and so it was necessary to make sure that the family was well protected from harmful forces. This time also marked the New Year, as it corresponded with the nightfall of the year-day, and in Ancient Europe, nightfall was considered to be the beginning of a new day. This corresponds to the festival of Diwali in Hinduism, and is also celebrated by Zoroastrians as Mehregan (though the Iranian New Year is tied to the Spring Equinox festival of Nowruz instead). As such, this was a time to wind down and prepare for longer nights and reduced outdoor activity, and folk in the past would have focused more on indoor activities such as spinning and weaving, woodworking and storytelling, which is another reason that this festival was so strongly associated with the home.

Halig Winterfylleth!

Wulf Willelmson

Excerpt from the ‘Shahnameh’ (Persian ‘Book of Kings): Bahram Gur’s Priest Ruins and Revives a Village

‘Another day Bahram went out hunting at dawn with a group of companions. His vizier Hormozd rode on his left, and a priest on his right, and the two told him tales of Jamshid and Feraydun [legendary early kings of Iran]. They took no dogs, cheetahs and hawks with them and searched through the morning, but by noon they’d found no trace of either onager [wild ass] or deer, and when the sun shone in the heavens like a bright coin, Bahram irritatedly made his way back from his expedition. A green area, filled with men and flocks, appeared, and many people gathered round to stare at the hunters. Bahram was weary and feeling short-tempered; he’d hoped to dismount and rest in the village, but no one came forward to meet him, and the place seemed inhabited by donkeys. He grew angry with the people there and looked askance at them, saying to his priest:

May this green, prosperous village be a den
Of beasts – a wild and uncultivated fen –
And may the water dry in every ditch
And turn to stagnant and black as pitch!

The priest knew how to fulfil Bahram’s command and he turned aside from the road and entered the village. He said, “This green area, filled with houses, people and flocks, has pleased King Bahram and he has a new plan for you. Rejoice in your hearts, you are all masters now and can make this a splendid place. Here women and children are masters too, and no one has to obey anyone else. Labourer and headmen are equal: men, women and children, you are all headmen of the village!” A cry of joy went up from the inhabitants; in their minds men and women were the same, and labourers and servants were equal to the village headman. Since the young men now felt no fear of authority, they cut off the heads of the village elders: everyone became muddled up with everyone else, and bloodshed became commonplace. The area became as confused and horrifying as the Day of Judgement, and the inhabitants fled. A few weak, old men stayed there, but every sign of activity or prosperity had gone. The whole village took on a rundown look: trees withered, irrigation ditches dried up, houses were now in ruins, fields were uncultivated, men and their flocks were nowhere to be seen.

A year passed, and the following spring Bahram again went hunting in that area. He reached the place that had seemed so pleasant and prosperous, but the village he remembered was not there. All the trees were dead, the houses in ruins, the fields empty of flocks and people. Bahram’s heart was wrung to see this; he feared God and wished to act justly. He said this to his priest, “Ruzbeh, it hurts me to see this lovely place in ruins, go quickly and provide them with money from my treasury, so that they won’t suffer any more.”

The priest left the king’s side and rode into the ruins. He went from house to house and finally found an old man who had no work. He dismounted, greeted him politely, and invited the man to sit with him. He said, “Old man, who has ruined this prosperous place?”

The old man answered him, “By chance one day
The king and his companions come this way.
A foolish priest with no sense in his head,
One of those noble idiots, born and bred,
Declared to us, ”You’re all the masters here,
Social distinctions are to disappear.
The ranks of those who rule and those who serve
Are niceties that no one need observe.”
As soon as he’d said that our little village
Was filled with fights and plundering and pillage:
May God reward that man’s stupidity
And fill his days with grief and misery!”

Grieved to hear this, Ruzbeh asked “Who is your village headman?” The man replied,

“A headman’s a place where grain is grown,
And men can reap the harvest they have sown.

Ruzbeh said, “You are to be the headman here, you’re to rule over these ruins. Ask the king for cash, seed, cows, and donkeys, and bring back to your village whoever you can find who is destitute. You are to be the headman and they’re to do as you tell them. And don’t curse that priest who came here before, as he didn’t want to say what he did. If you need help from the king’s court, I’ll send you whatever you need. All you have to do is ask.”

The old man was pleased to hear this and forgot his former sorrows. He immediately went from house to house to find men to work on the irrigations channels and to start cultivating the land again. They asked neighbouring villages for donkeys and cows and set to work making the plain productive. The headman and his villagers worked hard at planting trees everywhere, and their hearts were filled with happiness each time they saw a house had been rebuilt. All those who had fled from the place weeping and wailing came back one by one when they had heard of the success of the old headman’s efforts. The watercourses in the streets were rebuilt, the stocks of cows, donkeys, and sheep multiplied in the pastures, and the trees that people planted everywhere made the former ruins look like paradise.

By the following year the village had responded to the old man’s efforts and was as he wished. Once again, at spring time, the king went hunting with his priest, Ruzabeh, and for a third time they came to the village. Bahram Gur saw the land under cultivation, the herds of animals, the fine buildings, the plains and mountain slopes covered with sheep and lambs, the water courses coming down from the foothills, and the village filled with handsome men. He turned to the priest and said, “Ruzbeh, what have you done? This fine village was in ruins, its people and animals had fled. What did you give them so that they were able to make it flourish again?”

Ruzbeh answered, “One speech was enough to bring this ancient village to its knees, and one idea was enough to make it prosperous again, and so rejoice the heart of Persia’s king. You had ordered me to destroy the village using money from your treasury, but I was afraid of God’s judgement and the reproaches of noblemen and commoners. I saw that strife results when one has two thoughts, and knew that when a town has two masters it cannot survive. I told the village elders that there was no master over them, that women were masters now, and children too, as were servants and labourers. When the commoners became masters, the master’s heads were brought down to dust. This lovely place was destroyed by a speech, and I escaped reproach and did not fear God’s judgement. But then the king forgave them, so I went to them and suggested another course of action. I set a wise old man over them as their headman, someone who was eloquent and knowledgeable. Through his efforts he restored the village’s prosperity and made his inferiors’ hearts happy.  Once one man was put in charge of the rest, things went well again: goodness increased and evil decreased. I showed them the way of evil and then I opened the door to God for them. If a man uses speech in the right place, it is worth more than fine jewels. If you want your soul to have no troubles, wisdom must be your king, and language your champion. May the king’s heart be eternally happy, triumphing over all evil and ruin.”

The king responded, “Ruzbeh, you are worthy of a crown!” He gave this clever and perspicacious man a purse of gold coins and a royal robe of honour, raising his head to the clouds in glory.’

[Abolqasem Ferdowsi, English translation into prose by Dick Davis, Penguin 1997]


Bahram V was the ruler of the Persian Empire between 420 and 438 AD and this story, written in the 10th Century, is set during his reign. It is a cautionary tale that demonstrates how a society can fall apart, but also how it can be built up again. The village is a microcosm of society and the events that occur mirror the process of dissolution and revival. Because the villagers did not greet the king and his entourage, this signals the beginning of the society’s fall, as the lack of manners and hospitality to strangers invited the king’s wrath upon them. The first speech given by the king’s priest is an example of the kinds of things touted by demagogues that preach egalitarianism, which then ensues in class warfare. The suggestion that everyone is equal results in a loss of focus and purpose other than removing power from those that have it in order to distribute it equally. Since each person is considered the same as everyone else, this results in confusion about who is to do what and so nobody knows what they should be doing. The distress that comes from loss of purpose when one is out of touch with their innate capabilities drives people to insanity, and so they become self-serving and opportunistic. The fact that no one can co-cooperate means that everybody becomes poor and no longer has a sense of common purpose. At this point, people begin to flee and leave for greener pastures, leaving only the old who are unable or unwilling to leave. And so, as there are no young folk, the society has no future.

However, upon the return of the priest once the king sees how destitute the village is, he finds the wisest of the old men, who knows how the society of his village fell apart and why. Because of his capability to understand this, he was appointed as the new headman of the village and was able to use the money given to him by the king to pay for new people to work for him. This demonstrates that there are natural leaders among a population, and that the wisest should be considered the most able to be so. Once there is somebody who can work with others and make use of their labour, their focus becomes finding what each person’s skills and abilities are in order to make use of them in working towards a common goal. The headman does not need to interfere in the lives of those that he commands, and so there is no resentment between people when they adopt the roles of master and servant. Thus, by recognizing the most agreeable purpose between individuals on a voluntary basis, a society can prosper and thrive.

When the king inquires about the splendid state of the village on his third visit, the priest explains that words and ideas can have a powerful effect upon a society, and can tear it down just as easily as they can build it up. By seeking to recognize a common truth with others, a society becomes functional and able to provide for the needs of those who inhabit it. This can only be done by working out the distinctions between those who can lead and those who follow. There is also the aspect of provider and dependant, which can be reflected in gender roles and definitions of maturity. As men are more likely to assume leadership roles, it does not make sense to expect this as something which women are as likely to fulfil, just as most men would struggle to perform roles better performed by women. Similarly, children are not considered capable of leadership as their immaturity makes them unsuited to the responsibilities of running a society.

However, whenever the natural tendency towards unity is disrupted and the idea of multiple leaders is introduced, society fractures into factions based on personal allegiance, and so people will not see themselves as part of a complete group, but as smaller competing collectives based on class, gender or race. When this happens, it results in hostility and bloodshed, and the benefits from the conflict are generally reaped by those who started trouble in the first place. But since the priest did not have a self-serving motive to begin with and was also able to promote truth and harmony, he appointed the old man to the role of leadership and returned the society to even better prosperity than before. Thus, the priest demonstrates that the mastery of language and the ability to convey truth or falsehood is a powerful tool that should not be abused if one has good intentions. King Bahram remarks that his priest deserves a crown, recognizing that wisdom is required to rule justly.

Wulf Willelmson