The Law of Reciprocity and the Con of Corporate Socialism

For a society to function in a way that benefits those involved in it, there must be some form of reciprocity that is based on voluntary exchange. In Modern society, this reciprocation is fundamentally based on the exchange of labour for capital, and so money is given to workers usually on the basis of how many hours are worked. The employer gains capital for himself by charging more for the goods or services provided by employees than is actually paid to them. This monetary gain is his ‘profit’, and the pursuit of profit is what is known as capitalism.

In some cases, profit is honestly earned by an artisan who charges more for a product than it cost them to produce, as the extra charge represents the extra labour that went into putting materials together into a finished product. This becomes a form of exploitation when extended to getting other people to do the work for you. However, there is nothing wrong with this if the decision to do so is voluntary. Someone who would rather work for somebody else to gain their capital rather than than through their own ideas and efforts is perfectly suited to acting as an employee.

Unfortunately, this is many times not the case in Modern society, as labour is often given reluctantly, and is usually driven out of necessity This may even be because even if one wishes to become their own employer, the need to make ends meet forces many talented people to work for others, often in selling goods that they are not interested in promoting themselves. This is a result of corporatism, where a small number of successful multinational corporations have created a monopoly through out-competing small businesses and dominating the market. This has only been possible through subsidies given by the state. As governments collect money through taxation, this means that they are using public funds to support private enterprise. This should give you the first hint that our governments are corrupt (from the local Scottish parliament, through the old imperial UK parliament to the EU superstate), since on what basis do they have the right to prioritize certain businesses over others?

The answer is that it is purely out of self interest at the expense of the public, as politicians benefit from the support of corporate donors to fund their political campaigns, and so in turn they give out subsidies and look the other way when those same corporations mislead the public or damage the environment. The common man is not considered in this exchange, other than a means of gaining either taxes or profit. The reason given for government subsidies is that certain businesses act in the interest of the common good, and so should be given support to fund their projects. However, businesses cannot be trusted to act in this way, as their only responsibility is to deliver a profit to their shareholders, and so their financial gain will always come at the expense of other concerns. This is simply the way of business, it only becomes a problem when said businesses become so powerful that have influence over governments that choose to support them.

Many who can see through this charade advocate socialism as the answer, since this is seen as a way to redistribute the wealth that is earned by the workers through the state, and thus ending the cycle of exploitation. The absurdity of this idea becomes apparent when you consider that wealthy billionaires are usually the ones who fund left-wing organizations. They use their capital gained through exploitation and usury to fund groups which pose no real threat to their interests. The reason for this is that, in order to achieve the ideals that utopian socialists wish for (specifically equality, a concept based on nonsense, as humans are all born with different capabilities and so can never be equal), they must empower the state to enforce their wishes. The same state that colludes with corporations in order to maintain the current order.

While left-wing organizations, such as the Labour Party, claim to advocate for the interests of the workers (or ‘labourers’), the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats support the ‘capitalist’ banks and corporations. In reality, nobody supports the small businesses that are based on garnering wealth through honest capitalism. They are also disadvantaged by the partnership between big business and the state, as they are consistently crushed through excessive regulations that favour wealthy corporations that can afford to pay the fees that accompany such regulation.

This balancing act maintains the power structure between exploiter and exploited, with no option in between and where human worth is gauged by how much money one can make, not through inherent worth based on talents that do not involve the manipulation of capital. The Left continues to encourage the common man to act as if he is ‘oppressed’ (and so becomes an eternal victim, always blaming others and never bettering his situation through his own efforts), while the Centre tries to convince us that our current situation is good for us (the Right has no real influence in Modern politics, and will never be allowed to by those who benefit from the demise of nationalism and conservatism).

There is no choice and there is no ‘people power’ within this system. Corporate socialism is the political game that suits the elites best, as they can continue to find excuses to employ Soviet-lite mass surveillance and suppression of free speech, while still allowing a measure of private enterprise so that people are fooled into believing that we still live in a capitalist society. A man who gives his labour unwillingly is by definition a slave, and this is the position that many of us have been forced into through globalization, as decisions which affect our conditions are made by people far away and whom we have nothing in common with.

The corporate state has managed to elevate itself above the people by bribing us with material goods and by employing mind-numbing media such as newspapers, television and cinema to enforce their world-view and to convince us that it is what we want. Through the proliferation of consumer goods meant to satiate our desires, they have scientifically perfected their psychological manipulation of our minds in order to assure us that the exchange is voluntary, and that our freedom and dignity are a price worth paying for commodities and comfort.

This is why, in a political sense at least, there is no true or effective opposition to the Modern order, as the system sustains itself through itself. No party manifesto filled with dubious promises can ever address the real problems which plague our society, as this would require the dismantling of the whole structure to its foundations in an effort to start again. What has happened is that we have set our expectations too high, and that in order to maintain the perpetual economic growth (which is, by the way, impossible) we have had to coerce people, by hook or by crook, into maintaining the monster that has been created.

This means that people in general go to work and pay their taxes unwillingly, as many of us (particularly in the younger generations) have lost the will to work towards a system that only abuses us and expects us to provide for the needs of the older generations, when we know we will not receive the same treatment in the future due to corruption and overpopulation. Once the trust has been lost, there can be no willing exchange, and holding society together becomes a game of coercion and manipulation in order to get people to work towards a common goal, because there is no incentive for people to willingly work towards filling the pockets of the rich and little else.

It is for this reason that Modern society is doomed. The ‘American Dream’ that has been exported to the rest of the world now rings hollow, and there is no way that the mess that has been created can ever be fixed. Modernity gives us nothing truly fulfilling, it simply takes and takes and takes, as its benefactors are constantly trying to convince us that it is what we want, and they are consistently failing because we can see the results, or lack thereof. It is not only we humans who are having the life sucked out of us, but also Mother Nature, who is constantly having to pay the price in order to prop up our society’s ridiculously high demands for convenience and material abundance.

There will come a point when she will have nothing left to give, and presumably will begin to take from us what we owe her in order for balance to be restored. Learning to give and take in equal measure is necessary for order and survival. Do not give to parasites that will never give anything back, and this includes uncaring employers and abusive partners; as well as what can be considered ‘corporate charities’, where money that is not donated for a specific cause cannot be trusted not to be misused as a means of earning profit.

This is not to say that one should not be charitable, in fact, the cosmic law of reciprocation means that goodwill is repaid with good luck. However, we should never feel compelled to give out of guilt or hoping for a reward, but rather out of recognising mutual benefit and shared interest. This process is not merely a human construct, but is based on cosmic law (known in Sanskrit as rita, from which we derive the word ‘right’) and is the basis on which we give offerings to the gods in mutual trust. This awareness is something that Modern society has lost, but it is essential to us to learn in order to survive as part of a tribe in the hard times to come.

Wulf Willelmson

‘Deep Ecology’ and Our Place in Nature

I have to admit that there is something very appealing about the worlds shown in fantasy literature, films and video games. One feature that seems to encompass all of these portrayals is the prevalence of wildlife and wildwood, which are also populated by magical beings such as elves, goblins and trolls. The forests and open landscapes are what many heroes have to pass through on their quests, as the human settlements are either small villages or castles, as opposed to large cities that have very little biodiversity in and around them. The reason for this is fairly obvious, it reflects our continuous longing for a time before, when we had not learned how to exploit the land and its creatures, and we lived alongside rather than apart form Nature.

Our native mythology is the source of this imagery in modern fantasy, as our ancestral memories will evoke the desire to once again see what our land was like before the extermination of the wolf and the boar, but also other paranormal creatures such as BBCs (British Big Cats, large panther-like felines seen throughout the British countryside and are part of our native lore). Not only that, but the forests and caves are also places where a hero must journey to seek some sort of person as part of their quest, or to find some special object and overcome a guardian (such as a dragon or an elfin knight). Our relationship with the land is reflected in our stories and songs, and so its’ welfare is directly linked with our spiritual health as a people and how much we value our own country. Another consistent feature of fantasy is the absence of high technology, as most technology is represented at a Medieval level, with honourable weapons, such as swords and shields and bows and arrows, being used in the place of guns and drones. The destruction is present, but it does not throw the whole system out of balance, as warfare and disaster is a part of life and will happen no matter how much ‘control’ we may think we have over Nature.

One of the major downsides of Modern bourgeois life is that it has become so dreadfully mundane and mediocre, the most that any of us can expect is for things to trundle on in the search for eternal comfort and ease without regard for what we are even meant to do with the time given to us to live on Earth. Few believe in the existence of fairies or sprites because they are not material beings, and so they cannot exist because they do not inhabit the same material plain as we do (Midgard is the ‘Middle Earth’., betwixt the heavens and the underworld and surrounded by the Otherworld). The result is that our environment becomes nothing special to us, it provides useful resources in the form of raw materials and space to build more habitations; but it isn’t seen to have any independent or intelligent agency of its own, and many are still confused as to why things exist in the forms that they do and what we are meant to do with them.

There are few reasons why our economic system that is based on continuous expansion (a concept so absurd is is frightening to think that so many in power take it seriously) would consider the loss of biological life to be less important than human demands, and also the fact that all reigning political and social ideologies place humans above the Earth and not on it. For this, we have the lasting influence of the Abrahamic religions to thank, as the commandment by ‘Yaweh’ to “be fruitful and multiply” did not stress the importance of population control and the consequences of ‘giving’ the Earth to humans. We cannot be ‘given’ the Earth as we are a part of it, and we are dependent on each other’s survival. We would not exist if Nature did not think us suitable to evolve to this level, and if we were not expected to fulfil our duties and responsibilities to maintaining balance on the planet.

The direct connection that we have with Nature is one of the reasons why ideologies that place human ideals above the laws of Nature consistently fail when put into practice, because they do not consider what is required to maintain a healthy ecosystem and that it is only within this framework that a society can survive long-term. Understanding our influence on our environment is essential to functioning in the real world and requires the humility of seeing your own needs as just as important as other life around you. This is known as ‘deep ecology’, which stresses the need to assess our impact on life around us and to reduce not only our own comfort and excessively high standards of living, but also to think about the importance of particular organisms and their purpose in the environment. Every life form belongs somewhere, even hated creatures such as wasps or spiders are essential to their own sphere of existence, which requires predation on flies and other insects to control their population. Animals such as rats or ants only become a problem and breed in excessive numbers if humans have radically altered the environment in a way that does not accommodate animals with more niche requirements, and they simply survive on the waste left by humans, which is now very excessive. Some issues are uncomfortable to discuss an many are so detached from Nature that they don’t wish to deal with things like pollution from the production of plastics or the amount of human waste that ends up in the sea because there is nowhere else to dump it that doesn’t cause disease (at least in the mean time).

Environmentalism has become sadly associated with socialist values, and many ‘Green’ parties have embraced such ideas to the point where they seem more important than actually dealing with our ecological crisis. They, unfortunately have the tendency to espouse ‘social ecology’, which (as you can probably tell from the word ‘social’) is an attempt to bring the environment in line with our perceived needs. The idea that we can maintain the same standard of living while also reducing our destructive impact on our world is another idealistic and unrealistic perspective on the environment. Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels will not reduce our excessive demand for energy, for which governments seem content to subsidize corporations to build even more roads and infrastructure for the sake of very inefficient ‘green energy’ technology (such as windfarms and hydroelectric dams). The political response is completely skewed towards meeting this demand, and the difference is only whether we should primarily rely on fossil fuels or not.

Modern values are also not consistent with Natural Law, in that they do not consider laws which are not made by man and cannot accommodate the problems that result from introducing and exterminating certain species from an ecosystem.While some foreign species can be introduced with little harm to the native flora and fauna (such as beech and maple trees and fallow deer), this is usually because they also come from a similar ecosystem, which may or may not be nearby. However, plants such as rhododendron from the Mediterranean and and animals like grey squirrels from North America have had a devastating impact on the British ecosystem, as they compete so fiercely with the native inhabitants to ensure their own survival in a foreign environment, they end up taking over and decreasing biodiversity. If humans are at least part animal (providing the possibility that we are also divine), then that also means that we are subject to Nature’s laws and the interactions between different human populations can mirror those between native and invasive species, if peoples with incompatible cultures are introduced to the wrong environment.

Such issues are uncomfortable to address in such a repressed society, where people’s personal sensitivities are held above objective truth. There is also no equality in Nature, and each being is possessed of its own capabilities which enable it to compete with other organisms. If you remove this then you are left with a monoculture, where only a few select species exist in large numbers are there is less biodiversity. Ignoring problems does not make them go away, and the consequences of our hubris are building over time. It is unfortunate that Modern society has made the masses weak and ignorant to their surroundings, as this will only mean that catastrophe will be something unexpected and impossible to deal with for those who don’t know what is coming. As with personal emotions that create a shadow if they are not accepted to be a part of oneself (which embodies all that is rejected and becomes larger if ignored), the waste from nuclear power, plastic production, cleaning chemicals, humans and their food will create a fertile environment for disease, which always spreads quicker in overpopulated areas, and the human species could see a near extinction event.

This is a result of our own collective neglect and loss of spiritual values, as we struggle to find meaning in a Hell which we have created for ourselves because we have lost our connection with Nature. I’m sorry to say that most of our problems will not be fixed by focusing on reducing our ‘carbon footprint’ to counter ‘climate change’ and the practice of recycling. At this point, the best thing one can do is to focus on reducing your own living standards (which is not the same as what we might associate with the Third World, but rather a cleaner and more autonomous lifestyle that reduces general consumption) and work with others who are doing the same. The sad fact about environmentalism is that it cannot save all of the people on the planet and also restore the balance of the environment. This is why the wishes of ‘humanitarian’ philosophies will always be at odds with Natural Law and the equilibrium that we are supposed to uphold.

Thankfully, continuing our quest of insight into the world around us will guide us through dark times, and Nature will be kinder to those who understand what she requires from us. This does not mean that learning to live in harmony with Nature will make you immune to any of the disasters and plagues that exist in the world, but an autonomous lifestyle will help to deal with such events. Survivalism and self-reliance are the most useful ideals when learning to live naturally, as this enables you to be responsible for yourself, but also more free like a wild animal. ‘Wildness’ is simply ecological maturity, it is the point at which an organism comes into its own and is instinctively able to determine its place within the world around it after growing up. The self-domestication of mankind has led to our infantalization and many of us are still too immature to deal with reality well into old age.The age of the ‘suffering god’ (Christ on the cross or Wotan on the tree) has ended and we have come into a time that requires a different outlook.

Instead of the loss of honour that has affected our species for thousands of years, we can now reclaim that lost glory as we recognise the importance of who we are and where we are from. Heritage is not only our connection to our ancestors and our folk, but also to the land that we live on. Once we can again imagine the world we inhabit as both wonderful and horrible, material and spiritual and full of both loss and joy, we can regain our power to act with dignity and respect to our Great Mother. Her lessons will be harsh and it will inevitably become a matter of survival of the fittest, in ways physical, mental and spiritual. An awareness of the causes of disease and of cures that can be found in the wild fulfils our needs for interaction and communion with Nature and also enables us to protect ourselves and our families against the forces of death and destruction. To live without a fear of death is the way of the warrior, and this code of behaviour is our best chance of survival if we wish to maintain the prosperity of our folk.

Wulf Willelmson